Saturday 11 March 2017

The liberal narrative is in denial about Iran

The war of words coming out of the Islamic Republic of Iran continues to intensify.

New video footage of Iranian Defense Minister Hossein Dehghan further demonstrates Iran’s hostile attitude and intentions towards America and its allies.

Speaking with Iran’s state-broadcaster, the Islamic Republic of Iran News Network, Dehghan discusses his government’s strategy when it comes to dealing with its “enemies” in the West.

“Today, the main threat is from the arrogant regime, America, and the Zionists,” said Dehghan in the February 7, 2017 interview. The clip was posted and translated by the Middle East Media Research Institute TV Monitor Project, also known as MEMRI TV.

The Iranian defence minister goes on to explain exactly how Iran plans to strategically “fight such a threat” and gain “the upper hand in the battle.”

“There will be a situation of asymmetric warfare,” said Dehghan. “We need to have sufficient power to surprise the enemy. In other words, we need to hit the enemy where it hurts the most.”

Unlike traditional wars fought between national armies, asymmetric warfare describes a terrorist insurgency – much like the terrorist armies waging war throughout the Middle East. These insurgencies often target civilians, and use unconventional weapons and tactics to destabilize a society.

The 9/11 terrorist attacks were an example of asymmetric warfare.

These alarming comments are particularly distressing considering news reported earlier this week in the Sun of a video showing a high-ranking Iranian military official claiming that Iran had a “clandestine movement” operating in the United States.

Hassan Abbasi, a strategist and military advisor with the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), claimed Iran no longer needed to develop a nuclear weapons program because, as he said, America’s “6,000 nuclear warheads are (the) targets of our plans for our guerilla movement.”

America’s nuclear facilities would certainly be an example of hitting “the enemy where it hurts the most,” as Dehghan put it.

As has been the case for years, Iran’s government officials openly and transparently state their hateful intentions. They continue to tell us that they want to wage war against the West. They even explain their tactics and strategy.

And yet, many in the West are willing to naively turn a blind eye to such belligerence.

The CBC, for example, recently sent reporters to Iran and published an article that encourages Canadian investors to do business with Iran. The article described how a Chinese-state owned enterprise invested in the Iranian state-owned oil industry, and how it was a “model of international cooperation.”

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau likewise seems unable to recognize or condemn Iran’s bad behaviour. Trudeau lifted sanctions against the regime and has stated his intentions to restore diplomatic relations with Iran. It was one of his election campaign promises.

Canadian officials are now in official talks with the theocratic dictatorship, working to find common ground. Meanwhile, Iran continues its aggression.

Last March, it test-launched two ballistic missiles, one with the inscription “Israel must be wiped out” written in Hebrew. Since that time, Iran has tested two more sophisticated missiles capable of reaching Israel.

And now we have video footage of two senior members of the Iranian regime describing, in some detail, how they intend to lead and sponsor terrorist attacks in North America.

When it comes to Iran, we can either trust liberal politicians or we can trust Iran’s own words and actions. We can’t trust both.

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http://www.torontosun.com/2017/03/10/the-liberal-narrative-is-in-denial-about-iran




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